• General
  • Itinerary
  • The tour includes
  • Opinions
  • Questions

Source: (text) Audio tourist guide, (photo) Destepti.ro

It was built in 1976 in memory of Vlad Țepeș. Vlad Țepeș was born in the fortress of Sighișoara in the Transylvanian Voivodeship, being the son of Vlad Dracul and a Transylvanian noblewoman. He was married three times: first to a noblewoman from Transylvania – Cneajna Bathory, then to Jusztina Szilagyi and then to Ilona Nelipic, Matei Corvin’s cousin.

He had five children, four boys and a girl: Radu and Vlad from the first marriage, Mihail and Mihnea cel Rău from the second and Zaleska from the third marriage. During his reign, Wallachia temporarily gained its independence from the Ottoman Empire. In 1453, the remnants of the Byzantine Empire were conquered by the Ottomans, who gained control of Constantinople (now Istanbul) and threatened Europe. The Ottoman Empire came to dominate much of the Balkans (the territories of present-day Serbia, partly Hungary, partly Romania, Bulgaria, Albania and Greece), the expansion to the west stopping at the gates of Vienna, whose siege failed.

In this historical context, Vlad Țepeș fought to defend his reign and the country, using against the enemies the methods of deterrence specific to the era, which included exemplary executions and tortures and intimidation. Vlad Țepeș soon became famous for his brutal methods of punishment. According to Saxon detractors in Transylvania, he often ordered convicts to be impaled as well as other tortures for the wicked. But the favorite torture was the stabbing, from which comes the nickname Țepeș, the one who shoots. He used this form of execution in 1457, 1459 and 1460 against Transylvanian merchants who had not complied with its trade laws. The incursions he made against the Saxons from Transylvania were at the same time acts of protectionism meant to promote the commercial activities in Wallachia. In addition, at that time it was common for the pretenders to the throne of Wallachia to find support in Transylvania, where they were waiting for the right moment to act.

He was assassinated at the end of December 1476. His body was beheaded and his head sent to the sultan, who placed him on a spike, as proof of the triumph over Vlad the Impaler. It was hypothesized that “Dracula” was buried at Snagov Monastery, on an island near Bucharest. Recent examinations have shown that Țepeș’s “tomb” at the monastery contains only a few Neolithic horse bones and not the true remains of the Wallachian lord. According to the famous historian Constantin Rezachevici, his tomb would be on the site of the Comana monastery, the foundation of the voivode.

Share sau like daca ti-a placut articolul:

No details found.

No details found.

Share sau like daca ti-a placut articolul:

There are no reviews yet.

Be the first to review “The statue of Vlad the Impaler – Giurgiu Municipality”

No Details Found